What is a Spitting Eagle Quarter?

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Written By Natasha Jones
I'm Natasha Jones, an avid collector of coins, stamps, and paper money. My passion drives me to seek unique finds, from antique shops to international exchanges. I enjoy connecting with fellow collectors through forums and meet-ups, sharing discoveries and insights. Collecting, for me, is about preserving history and building a community around this shared interest.

What is a spitting eagle quarter? If you’re a coin collector, you may have heard of the term “Spitting Eagle Quarter.” But what exactly is it?

This variety of 1983-P Washington Quarters is identified by a die clash that left a raised ridge from Washington’s neck below the eagle’s beak.

This makes it appear like the eagle is spitting, hence the name “Spitting Eagle Quarter.”

The Spitting Eagle Quarter is a unique error coin that has become popular among collectors.

The obverse causes the die to clash with the reverse die, leaving a raised ridge on the coin’s surface.

While it is most commonly found in the 1983-P Washington Quarter, it can also appear in any year Washington Quarter with that obverse/reverse design.

If you’re wondering about the rarity and value of the Spitting Eagle Quarter, it is considered a relatively rare error coin and can fetch a premium price among collectors.

The coin grading company Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) even recognizes this variety and attributes it on its certification labels.

If you come across one of these coins, its value could be worth checking.

Key Takeaways:

1. The Spitting Eagle Quarter is a variety of 1983-P Washington Quarters identified by a die clash that left a raised ridge from Washington’s neck below the eagle’s beak.
2. It is considered a relatively rare error coin and can fetch a premium price among collectors.
3. The coin grading company Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) recognizes this variety and attributes it on its certification labels.

What Is a Spitting Eagle Quarter?

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The Spitting Eagle Quarter is a distinctive variation of the 1983-P Washington Quarter, identifiable by a die-clashing occurrence that resulted in a raised ridge emerging from Washington’s neck, just below the eagle’s beak.

This anomaly creates the illusion that the eagle is in the act of spitting.

Notably, this feature is a result of die clashing involving the obverse and reverse dies, and it could potentially manifest on any Washington quarter of the same obverse and reverse design, regardless of the year of minting.

Among Washington Quarter variations, the Spitting Eagle Quarter holds a prominent position, recognized for its unique attributes.

Its name stems from the phenomenon of die clash, wherein two dies collide without a coin blank in between.

Consequently, this interaction leaves an imprint on the reverse die, forming a distinct line adjacent to the eagle’s beak.

Notably, the Spitting Eagle Quarter was produced in the Philadelphia Mint.

The Spitting Eagle Quarter is not a rare error but a popular variety among coin collectors.

It is considered a minor error and does not significantly impact the coin’s value.

However, some collectors may pay a premium for a Spitting Eagle Quarter in uncirculated condition or with a high grade.

History of the Spitting Eagle Quarter

  • Origin
    • The Spitting Eagle Quarter is a variety of the Washington Quarter minted in 1983.
    • It is identified by a raised ridge from Washington’s neck below the eagle’s beak, making it appear like the eagle is spitting.
    • This variety is caused by die clashing, which occurs when the obverse die clashes with the reverse die during minting.
  • Discovery
    • The Spitting Eagle Quarter was first discovered by a collector in 1990.
    • The collector noticed the raised ridge on the coin and realized it was a previously unknown variety.
    • The discovery of the Spitting Eagle Quarter caused a stir in the numismatic community, and collectors began searching their collections for the rare variety.

Since the discovery of the Spitting Eagle Quarter, other die clash varieties have been identified on Washington Quarters and other coins.

Die clashes are common in minting but are usually removed before the coins are released into circulation.

However, some varieties, like the Spitting Eagle Quarter, slip through the cracks and become valuable collectibles.

Characteristics of the Spitting Eagle Quarter

If you’re a coin collector, you may have encountered the term “Spitting Eagle Quarter.” This term refers to a variety of the 1983-P Washington Quarter that has a unique characteristic.

This section will examine the physical features and minting errors associated with the Spitting Eagle Quarter.

Physical Features

The Spitting Eagle Quarter is identified by a raised ridge extending from George Washington’s neck to the eagle’s beak on the coin’s reverse side.

This raised ridge is caused by die clashing during the minting process.

The location of the raised ridge gives the appearance that the eagle is spitting, hence the name “Spitting Eagle Quarter.”

In addition to the raised ridge, the Spitting Eagle Quarter has the same physical features as a regular 1983-P Washington Quarter.

The coin has a diameter of 24.3mm and a weight of 5.67g. The obverse side of the coin features a left-facing portrait of George Washington, while the reverse side features an eagle with its wings spread.

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Minting Errors

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The Spitting Eagle Quarter is a minting error because the U.S. Mint did not intentionally create it.

Die clashing occurs when the obverse and reverse dies collide during the minting process, leaving an imprint of one die on the other.

In the case of the Spitting Eagle Quarter, the obverse die clashed with the reverse die, leaving a raised ridge on the reverse side of the coin.

While the Spitting Eagle Quarter is a relatively common minting error, it is still considered a valuable addition to any coin collection.

The rarity of the coin and its unique physical characteristics make it a sought-after item among collectors.

Value and Rarity of the Spitting Eagle Quarter

If you come across a Spitting Eagle Quarter, you may wonder about its value and rarity. Here’s what you need to know:

Market Value

The value of a Spitting Eagle Quarter can vary depending on its condition and grade.

However, these coins are generally considered rare and valuable.

According to recent sales data, the average market value of a Spitting Eagle Quarter in uncirculated conditions are around $70+.

According to USA Coin Book, this quarter usually goes for $75 for an MS65 grade coin.

Factors Influencing Rarity

Several factors can influence the rarity of a Spitting Eagle Quarter. These include:

  • Mintage
    • The Spitting Eagle variety was only produced in 1983 at the Philadelphia Mint.
    • While the exact mintage numbers are unknown, it is believed to be relatively low compared to other quarters of the time.
  • Die Clashes
    • Die clashes cause the Spitting Eagle variety during the minting process.
    • This means that not every coin produced in 1983 at the Philadelphia Mint will have the Spitting Eagle variety.
  • Condition
    • As with any coin, the condition of a Spitting Eagle Quarter can greatly influence its rarity and value.
    • Coins in higher grades are generally rarer and more valuable.

It’s important to note that while Spitting Eagle Quarters are considered rare and valuable, not every coin with this variety is worth a significant amount.

The value ultimately depends on the coin’s condition, grade, and other factors.

It is important to note that a Spitting Eagle Quarter is not to be confused with damage or wear on the coin, as it is a genuine variety caused by a die clash during the minting process.

Collectors and numismatists should always be aware of the different coin varieties and errors, as they can greatly affect a coin’s value and rarity.

Before you go…

Overall, the Spitting Eagle Quarter is an intriguing variety that adds to the diversity of the numismatic world. With its distinctive raised ridge and unique appearance, it is no wonder that collectors are drawn to this fascinating variety.

Check out my next article: “A Closer Look: Standing Liberty Quarters.”

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1 thought on “What is a Spitting Eagle Quarter?”

  1. I have a 1970 d spitting eagle with cracks uncirculated for sale. Why did you say it only happened in 1983

    Reply

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